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The Buddha’s way of practice centres on mindfulness, the felt continuity of awareness over time. This practice style applies equally to any and every activity, including the most mundane. Mindfulness is not a practice confined a specialised Dharma Hall or to particular meditation exercise. It is as applicable to preparing dinner as it is to sitting in a special posture on a cushion.

An online retreat is a domestic retreat, one carried out in our own unique circumstances in the midst of the everyday. We come together at certain times of day for instruction, discussion and group practice, then separate to apply our practice to our individual lives. In this way we bridge the gap between the dharmic and the domestic. We discover that the way of everyday life is also the way of awakening.

This retreat was designed for experienced practitioners. We spent four weeks in the radically impermanent weather of the upper Blue Mountains exploring impermanence, along with pain and not-self.

Mindfulness is a physical practice, and our relationship to body lies at its centre. When we are fully present to the six senses, when we accept ourselves as sentient bodies, then our heart settles and insight arises. As the Buddha said, describing his own practice before his awakening, “my body was calm and peaceful; and my heart was settled and unified (MN 4 Bhayabherava Sutta Fear & Dread).”

Mindfulness is a physical practice, and our relationship to body lies at its centre. When we are fully present to the six senses, when we accept ourselves as sentient bodies, then our heart settles and insight arises. As the Buddha said, describing his own practice before his awakening, “my body was calm and peaceful; and my heart was settled and unified (MN 4 Bhayabherava Sutta Fear & Dread).”

In this retreat we explored insight (vipassana), as understood by the Buddha and taught by Mahasi Sayadaw.

This retreat was for experienced practitioners, most of whom committed to a full month of practice. This gave time to explore the theory and practice of satipatthana (the applications of mindfulness) more fully.

When we practise mindfulness we become intimate with our moment-to-moment experience in ways that are not possible in the chaos of our everyday lives. In this retreat we explored intimacy and what this intimacy reveals.

This retreat was hosted by Melbourne Insight Meditation (MIM).

Remembering the Present: An online retreat held 7 to 16 July 2023.

“Mindfulness” translates the Pāli word sati, which literally means “memory.” Why is memory so important to the Buddha’s way of practice and realisation? Mindfulness remembers the present rather than the past. When we remember our awareness then we learn to live in the experienced present rather than the past and future of our dreams and nightmares. And it is only here, now, that practice and realisation take place.

This retreat was organised with the support of the Perth Insight Meditation Group.It was held in the WA/SE Asia time zone.

The Winter of Our Content: A 14-day retreat held at Kallara Conference Centre, Strathbogie

These are the teachings delivered during the depths of winter in beautiful Australian countryside in the foothills of the Snowy Mountains. The weather was cold; conditions were simple. Ideal circumstances for practice.